Witness a Self Organizing System at Pebble Ledge Ranch

A zebra chasing bubbles, a pony drumming, horses helping people heal, leaders listening from within, a herd running free – just another day at Pebble Ledge Ranch. Meet Toby, grazing in the field. If you look closely, you’ll see Holly, the zebra, in the background of the photo above!  The herd at Pebble Ledge Ranch shifts and changes with the cycle of the moment, the cycle of life, the cycle of nature.  These horses are not kept to ride and live as naturally as possible at the Ranch, interacting with each other and humans – knowing their role in the

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For the Good of the Hive

“The health of a honey bee is based on the health of the hive, not the individual bee. Collective action is necessary for growth and expansion. Humans are the same way, although we rarely act like it. Many of the issues we face today are not divided by borders. In fact, bee health or pollination issues are more likely to be solved by transcending them.” Matthew Willey When Melissa Stephenson, a Plexus Catalyst  shared information about the New Hampshire Honey Bee Initiative, a community wide project she is leading with artist Kin Schilling, it seemed like the perfect topic for

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Fractal Fields and Self Organization:These Commons Aren’t Tragic

Water Temples Sustain Intricate Systems Balinese farmers who maintain their ancient terraced rice fields and self organized networks of villagers cooperating in an intricate system of irrigation and shared decisions achieve rare successes. Without central planning, their planting practices create fractal patterns of growing that promote resilience and optimal harvests. The collective water systems are known as subaks, which are made up of forest that protect the water supply, the terraced landscape and rice fields connected by networks of natural and man-made waterways, villages, and temples that mark either a source of water or the passage of water downhill to

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