Category Archives: Complexity Matters

Plexus Institute is Self-Organizing

Plexus Institute was founded as a network for learning and engagement focused on practical implications and applications of complexity theory in real-life events. Through open conferences, research collaborations, projects and a diverse and active community, Plexus encouraged adopting a complexity lens for addressing organizational and institutional opportunities and challenges.Change is guaranteed and we are setting the conditions for the future with Plexus 2.0, a self-organizing network to connect, engage, practice and  support people shaping learning and projects rooted in complexity theory. Join us for Zoom sessions on October 17th and 20th, 2017 at 1:00 pm ET, where we will provide a brief overview and open

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Rx for Opioid Addiction: More Social Trust

Opioid overdoses have become the leading cause of death of Americans under age 50, and researchers say social isolation, economic distress, and fraying human ties can increase the physical and emotional pain that drives opioid abuse. A recent study published in The Journal of Health Economics reported that for every one percent increase in unemployment, the opioid overdose death rate in the U.S. rose by nearly four percent.  Researchers from Harvard University and Baylor College of Medicine found that U.S. counties with the lowest social capital have the highest opioid death rates. Social capital involves the degree to which people have networks of confidants, trusting connections to

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Leadership and ‘Self Directed Neuroplasticity’

 Understanding the workings of our own brains and practicing habits of thought that neuroscientists call self directed neuroplasticity can improve decision-making and over time contribute to greater capacity for leadership. “The Neuroscience of Strategic Leadership”  an article in Strategy + Business, describes research showing dynamic interactions between activity in the mind and the differing regions of the brain. The authors, Jeffrey Schwartz, a research psychiatrist at the University of California, Los Angeles, Josie Thomson , a leadership coach, and Art Kleiner, editor and chief of the magazine, drawing on history, science and knowledge of business, say understanding the dynamic can lead to more effective thinking and action.  

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Athletes, Scholars, Gut Microbes Have Their Own Circadian Rhythms

  Circadian Timing: Vital to Us and the Microbes Living in Us Circadian rhythms are the 24-hour cycles of physiological processes that take place in all living things, including fungi, cyanobacteria, plants, insects, animals and humans. These rhythms are important in the sleeping and eating patterns of all creatures, and in humans their influence ranges from moods, metabolism and obesity to health and illness, mental acuity and the performance of sports teams. Scientists at Harvard, Stanford, and the University of California, San Diego, analyzed 40 years of NFL of games between East Coast and West Coast teams, and found that

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What Do We Learn From Catastrophes?  

The social, physical and economic anguish that Hurricane Harvey visited upon flood-devastated Houston is reminding officials and residents in cities across the country of the need to plan for unexpected catastrophes. People rarely think ahead about the possible 500-year flood or likelihood of the tsunami or earthquake that kills thousands of people and leaves thousands more homeless. Scientists say such events have low probability and high consequence. And unless there is a recent memory, people don’t pay too much attention to risks that seem remote. But in Houston, more than 70 people have died, and the damage to homes, businesses, and roads will be

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Teacher Plays Saxophone as His Brain Tumor is Removed

For Love of Science, Music,and Medicine When a young music teacher stayed awake and played the saxophone during surgery to remove his brain tumor, it was part of an extraordinary six-month collaboration. The teacher wanted to be reassured he wouldn’t lose his musical ability. The medical team wanted to know more about how the brain processes music. Dan Fabbio was teaching music and finishing his Master’s degree in music education in the spring of 2015 when dizziness, nausea and oddly hallucinatory sights and sounds sent him to the hospital. He was 25 and had been in good heath. After having

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Networks of the Brain

Updating the Map In 2009, the Human Connectome Project (HCP) was launched to  to build a “network map” (connectome) for the healthy human brain. The purpose of the connectome is to decipher the amazingly complex wiring diagram to reveal what makes us uniquely human and what makes every person different from all others. Dr. Olaf Sporns from Indiana University at Bloomington, author of Networks of the Brain (February 2011) has been leading the work of creating a complete connection (network) map of the brain.  According to Sporns, “Understanding the human brain is one of the great scientific challenges of the 21st century.” The

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Infections May be the Key When Genes and Cells Go Rogue

A gene believed to have protected human survival in ancient times may have become a rogue agent that nudges many contemporary humans toward Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Ben Trumble is an anthropologist trained in evolutionary medicine who spent years learning about the lives of the Tsimane people, an indigenous forager-farming group in Bolivia. Interviewed in a New York Times story by Pagan Kennedy, Trumble observes that most medical research focuses on people who live in modern cities like New York and Los Angles, while our bodies are still designed for the early hunter-gatherer environment in which our species evolved. We don’t

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An Open Mind and a Permeable Consciousness

Do you ever get a scrambled mash-up picture in your mind when different visual images appear simultaneously in your left and right fields of vision? If you do, it may just be the price you pay for being open minded. Luke Smillie, a senior lecturer in psychology and director of the Personality Processes Lab at the University of Melbourne in Australia has been studying open-mindedness and traits that seem to relate to it. One such trait is called binocular rivalry. When different images are presented simultaneously to the left and right eye, the images usually flip back and forth in

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A Healing Fix From the Eclipse?

Geography, psychology and history suggest the total solar eclipse August 21, in addition to offering rare fascination for astronomers and sky watchers, could also provide opportunity for national healing in a time of partisan discord, science writer David Baron says. Baron, who is an eclipse fanatic himself, wrote the book “American Eclipse: A Nation’s Epic Race To Catch The Shadow Of The Moon And Win The Glory Of The World.”It’s a fascinating story of the total eclipse of 1878, a year when the U.S. population was still bitterly divided over the presidential election of 1876, one of the strangest and most controversial electoral contests in American

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