A Moment of Complexity

At pivotal moments throughout history, technological innovation triggers massive social and cultural transformation. Apparently unrelated developments, which had been gradually unfolding for years, suddenly converge to create changes that are as disruptive as they are creative. We are currently living in a moment of extraordinary complexity when systems and structures that have long organized life are changing at an unprecedented rate. Such rapid and pervasive change creates the need to develop new ways of understanding the world and of interpreting our experience. Mark C. Taylor I have found myself referring to Mark Taylor’s book The Moment of Complexity: Emerging Network

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Artists and Systems, a Relationship – #plexusdrawn

Artists. Hearing the word artist conjures a myriad of ideas, assumptions and perspectives about artists. Each of us has our own understanding of what an artist is and does based on our experiences, education and feelings. Part of why people have many perspectives on what artists do, how they do it and ultimately who they are is because artists have the capacity to hold tension (opposing views) since they are taught to see differing perspectives in a non-judgemental way – a skill absent from most other fields. There are many types of artists and many types of art. Imagine bringing

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Why REAL Dialogue is Generative

A Generative “Dialogue” leads to discovery of new ideas, behaviors, practices and unanticipated sources of value that could not have been predicted in advance. A generative process can nurture and guide the birth of new ways of thinking and doing. Generative Dialogue is not just clever wordsmithing, it is an intentional and co-creative engagement that delivers on the promise that the combined interactions of individuals produce a total effect that is greater than the sum of an individual’s actions. The work of Lorenz and Natasha Sell, co-founders of Sutra, is focused on transforming the process and experiences of online engagements.

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Compassion Changes How We Act and React

How we act when confronted with significant disruption – fear, anger, loss and grief — influences the long term health and resilience of both individuals  and groups. Consider how responding with compassion leads to new patterns of actions and reactions in the face of disruptive experiences. Dr. Helen Weng, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California–San Francisco, with faculty appointments at the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine and Neuroscape Center led a team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin who studied the development of compassionate thinking in adults. The study in psychologicalscience.org describes how one group was taught “compassion meditation,” adapted from Buddhist loving-kindness meditation. Participants

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Urge for Closure Misses Opportunities for the Future

We are standing at the crossroads in a VUCA world – an acronym that stands for volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity. Ambiguity and confusion can be stressful, but social psychologists say a pressing need for certitude can lead to all sorts of misconceptions and bad decisions. How do we take actions that leave room for both successful closure and opportunities for the next smart step? Jamie Holmes, the author of Nonsense: The Power of Not Knowing, argues we’d all be better off if we learned to embrace uncertainty and be less intent on finding immediate answers for every question. In an interview

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The ‘Anternet’—Ancient and Cutting Edge

Harvester Ants Increase Knowledge about Networked Systems Deborah Gordon, a Stanford biology professor who has studied ants for 20 years, found something extraordinarily sophisticated about the way harvester ants forage for food. She discovered that the ant colonies regulate their foraging activities based on the amount of food available and the amount of time it takes for a round trip between the nest and the food. Gordon recognized that this particular ant behavior approximates the way the Internet works, so she invited Stanford Computer Science Professor Balaji Prabhakar to have a look. Their collaboration is described in a Stanford News

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Tiny Teams Move Mighty Masses

Ants Are Model for Tiny Powerful Robots Researchers have developed a team of robot that can apply tiny amounts of force in concert to move objects thousands of times their own weight. The team members are six microrobots weighing a mere 3.5 ounces together, and they can pull car that weighs more two tons.  The micro-robots, modeled after ants, are so tiny their pieces had to be put together with tweezers. The car is the one that researcher David Christensen uses to commute to the Biomimetics and Dexterous Manipulation Laboratory on the Stanford University campus. Christensen told The New York

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Seeking Perfect Goals for an Imperfect World

There is little debate that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is essential to the evolution of continually emerging technology ecosystems. Computer systems through increasingly sophisticated algorithms (the DNA of AI) can now routinely perform tasks that previously required “human” intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, rule based decision-making, and problem solving.  The opportunities to leverage the potential of AI across all sectors has created the next paradigm shift in the complex relationship of how we think about humans and machines. From TedTalks to academic journals and every form of media, AI and it’s component parts Machine Learning (ML) and Deep Learning(DL)

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Mothering from the Inside Out

How can a mother feel a drug is more important than her baby? That question has perplexed policy makers, anguished families, and tormented women facing the complex challenges of addiction, recovery and childcare. Nancy E. Suchman, PhD, an associate professor of psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine is working on answering that question and helping mothers coping with addiction and caring for their children. One Answer is Rooted in Science “What happens on a biological level with chronic substance abuse is that the drug co-opts the neural system,” explains Suchman.” “The drug floods the brain with Dr. Suchman is pioneering

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From Fitting in to Flying Out

This post was adapted from several articles by Arnold Beekes, who shared his work in a Pop-Up Conversation. You are invited to listen to the second half of the conversation.    Do you believe that you will be an employee from graduation until retirement? Do you know what it means to be employed? The changes in the conditions and patterns of employment are shifting so rapidly that it is virtually impossible to plan for your entire work life. The speed of automation and robotization indicates that many jobs (blue-collar and white-collar) will disappear. In fact, that is happening now with many jobs

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